detraction


detraction
detraction, backbiting, calumny, slander, scandal arecomparable when they denote either the offense of one who defames another or casts aspersions upon him or what is uttered by way of defamation or aspersion.
Detraction stresses the injurious effect of what is said and the loss through it of something (as the esteem of others or his credit, his deserts, or even his good name) precious to the person affected
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bring candid eyes unto the perusal of men's works, and let not . . . detraction blast well-intended labors— Browne

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to listen to detraction is as much an act of detraction as to speak it— Manning

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Backbiting imputes both furtiveness and spitefulness to the one who asperses or defames; it suggests an unfair, mean, and cowardly attack when the victim is absent and unable to defend himself
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refrain your tongue from backbiting: for there is no word so secret, that shall go for nought— Wisdom of Solomon 1:11

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jealousy and intrigue and backbiting, producing a poisonous atmosphere— Russell

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Calumny stresses malicious misrepresentation; it therefore implies that the detractor is a liar and that his intent is to blacken another's name
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be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumnyShak.

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calumny differs from most other injuries in this dreadful circumstance: he who commits it can never repair it— Johnson

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to persevere in one's duty and be silent is the best answer to calumnyWashington

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Slander (for legal use, see MALIGN) stresses the dissemination of calumnies, especially those of a highly defamatory character; thus, a person who is given to calumny is prone to malicious misrepresentation of the acts, the motives, or the character of others; a person who is given to slander is prone to repeat calumnies or defamatory reports without ascertaining or with complete indifference to their truth or falsehood
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who spake no slander, no, nor listened to it— Tennyson

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this charge cannot be excused as a reckless slander. It was a deliberate falsehood, a lieNew Republic

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Scandal (see also OFFENSE, DISGRACE) usually suggests the activity of a gossip, especially of an idle, irresponsible gossip (a scandalmonger), who spreads abroad shocking details, whether true or untrue, that reflect discredit on another or that tend to tarnish or blacken his reputation
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it is difficult for a man to remain long in public life untouched by scandal

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her tea she sweetens, as she sips, with scandalRogers

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the reappearance of the priest upon the scene cut short further scandalCather

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Analogous words: *injury, damage, harm, hurt: *injustice, injury, wrong: defaming or defamation, aspersion, maligning, traducing, slandering or slander, calumniation, vilification, libeling or libel (see corresponding verbs at MALIGN)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • détraction — [ detraksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • XIIe; lat. detractio « dénigrement » ♦ Littér. et vieilli Action de rabaisser le mérite (de qqn), la valeur (de qqch.). ⇒ 2. critique, dénigrement. Détraction d une personne, d une doctrine. ⊗ CONTR. Apologie. ● détraction… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Detraction — • The unjust damaging of another s good name by the revelation of some fault or crime of which that other is really guilty or at any rate is seriously believed to be guilty by the defamer Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Detraction      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • detraction — Detraction. s. f. v. Medisance. La detraction est un grand peché. la detraction contre le prochain est contraire à la charité …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Detraction — De*trac tion, n. [F. d[ e]traction, L. detractio.] 1. A taking away or withdrawing. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The detraction of the eggs of the said wild fowl. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. The act of taking away from the reputation or good name of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • détraction — DÉTRACTION. sub. f. Médisance. La détraction contre le prochain est contraire à la charité …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • detraction — mid 14c., from O.Fr. detraccion detraction, disparagement, denigration, from L. detractionem (nom. detractio) a drawing off, from pp. stem of detrahere take down, pull down, disparage, from de down (see DE (Cf. de )) + trahere to pull (see TRACT …   Etymology dictionary

  • detraction — Detraction, Maledictio, Maledicentia, Obtrectatio. Eviter les detractions et meschantes paroles, Linguas hominum effugere. Par detraction, Maledice …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Detraction — Detraction, lat., Entziehung, Abzug, Verläumdung. Detractis detrahendis, nach Abzug des Abzuziehenden; detractis expensis, nach Abzug der Kosten. Detrahiren, entziehen, abziehen, verläumden …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • detraction — index aspersion, bad repute, contempt (disdain), criticism, defamation, denunciation, detriment …   Law dictionary

  • detraction — [n] misrepresentation; slander abuse, aspersion, backbiting*, backstabbing*, belittlement, calumny, damage, defamation, denigration, deprecation, derogation, disesteem, disparagement, harm, hit, hurt, injury, injustice, innuendo, insinuation,… …   New thesaurus


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